Browse Items (74 total)

  • Tags: anarchist

02-04_C.jpg
Note that his translation by Dorothy Daudley is from the 1932 French edition (Mussolini en chemise, q.v.), rather than the Italian original of 1927 in New York. This edition also includes an Epilogue (fancifully entitled "Hitler: Mussolini's…

02-05_A.jpg
This memoir describes Borghi's arrival in the world of anarchism, so new to him, in very dramatic terms. He was amazed by America: "For a long time, I did not understand it. I was attracted by it and at the same time repelled by it." The preface is…

02-07_A.jpg
Preface by Sébastien Faure. That the story of the transnational work of a figure like Malatesta was written in Italian, published in New York, and printed in Paris by an Italian printer, Tipografia Sociali, is testimony to the international nature of…

02-08_A.jpg
For a full description of this work and its significance, see the description of it in the entry for the 1927 edition (published in New York) of Mussolini in camicia, q.v. It took 11 years for Borghi's work to return in translation to New York, where…

02-26_A.jpg
Ludovico (really Michele) Caminita (b. Palermo, 1878 - d. New York 1943?) had one of the lengthiest, most varied and colorful lives of all the Italian anarchists in America, starting or writing a number of newspapers (with politics ranging from left…

02-27_A.jpg
Preface by Guido Podrecca. This atheist, anarchist tract by the then editor of Paterson's La Questione Sociale, the anarchist newspaper, was soon afterward served with notice by the "Vigilance Committee of the Law and Order" of Paterson that they…

03-13_A.jpg
Gaetano Bresci was a weaver working in Paterson, NJ in the 1890s, part of the vibrant Italian anarchist community; he traveled to Italy planing to assassinate the king, and succeeded. His 1901 hanging while in prison for his crime was declared a…

03-29_A.jpg
After the Italians of New York, those of San Francisco (and Chicago) probably had the most well-developed network of periodical press, book press, theatre, literature of various types, associations and other forms of collective efforts, including…

03-40_A.jpg
In 1929 La Fraternelle in Paris published this, D'Andrea's first book of poetry, about her own personal anguish and social struggles, shortly after D'Andrea had entered the U.S. See Richiamo all'anarchia for her bio.Note, on the title page, that this…

03-41_A.jpg
Virgilia D’Andrea (b. Sulmona, 1890; d. New York, 1933) did not live to see this work, published three decades after her death; she died suddenly at the young age of 43. D’Andrea immigrated to the U.S. with her lover, Armando Borghi in 1926 or 1927.…

01-20_A.jpg
In the 62 pages of this work are essays by various writers. Of particular note at the end, however, is a 4-page catalogue of other books published by the Libreria Sociologica.

01-22_A.jpg
After a 15-page almanac of historical events associated with each day of the year, there are essays by Luisa Migel, Pietro Gori, Joe Hill, and Clifford Howard. List of "opere" and "opuscoli" by anarchists are in the rear. Rear cover: "La Nostra…

01-35_A.jpg
This is a collection of essays by Camillo Berneri and Armando Borghi. Berneri was an Italian professor of philosophy, anarchist militant, propagandist and theorist. He organized anti-fascist brigadiers in Spain, and was assassinated by Stalinists in…

03-32_A.jpg
A two-act, heavily anti-fascist play published by the Detroit anarchist group’s bookstore, the Libreria Autonoma (Autonomous Bookstore). (See also Lolmo, Insurrezione e Rivoluzione, published by same publisher., part of the collecton.) Gigi Damiani…

03-36_A.jpg
For a brief bio of Damiani, see entry for his La bottega. After the deaths of Galleani and Malatesta, the fascist regime considered Damiani, always on the move although never in the U.S., as the leader of Italian anarchism.

04-23_A.jpg
This work is taken from Umanità Nova, a Milanese leftist newspaper that was founded in 1920, and shut down by the fascists in 1922. "Libreria Rossa" was the name adopted by Carlo Tresca, and used used on Tresca's letterhead, along with Il Martello,…

04-26_A.jpg
The verso of the cover of this pamphlet states “(Tradotto dal supplemento de La Protesta di Buenos Aires)” (translated from the supplement of La Protesta of Buenos Aires). La Protesta is an Argentine anarchist newspaper still in publication. The…

04-37_A.jpg
Born in Modena in 1877, Forzato-Spezia emigrated with her husband to the U.S. in 1891, and settled in West Hoboken, NJ. She opened a bookstore there renowned for its large selection of booklets of socialist propaganda and social novels. By 1907, she…

05-07_A.jpg
The first 65 pages of this work reprint and expand upon an earlier Galleani work, also in the Collection, Contro la guerra – contro la pace – per la rivoluzione sociale. In addition to the original essay, the work includes over fifty articles written…

05-09_A.jpg
A pamphlet of 24 pages, this work addresses Italian mothers about the injustices of a nation whose sons return from war, mutilated and undone. In particular it calls for the release of Augusto Masetti, a soldier who, during the Libyan war, is alleged…

05-10_A.jpg
This text is a lengthy work containing fifteen articles and essays from (and printed by the book publishing arm of) the anarchist Cronaca Sovversiva, led by author Luigi Galleani, describing various bombings by militant anarchists and their trials…
Output Formats

atom, dcmes-xml, json, omeka-xml, rss2